The root of our cause

Today we demand high production from agriculture, using highly efficient, but single purpose livestock breeds. In some cases, our old multi-purpose breeds have been reduced to dangerously low numbers and some have been lost forever.

Why preserve rare breed livestock?

There are three main reasons why we should preserve types or strains of domestic animal that are not needed by modern agriculture.

Education

Allowing us to see the types of animals our ancestors farmed; our living heritage.

Research

To study in detail the diversity and variation found in those old fashioned breeds.

The Future

Our farming needs are constantly changing, it is vital we have a pool of genetic material to fall back on.

Between 1900 and 1973 twenty-six native breeds of farm animal became extinct in Britain.

Fortunately in the 1960’s a small group of pioneers launched a crusade to prevent further loses. In 1973, their vision became the Rare Breeds Survival Trust (RBST) – an organisation dedicated to the conservation of Britain’s livestock heritage. Joe Henson was Founder Chairman of the RBST, which is now a thriving organisation with over 10,000 members and has his Royal Highness the Prince of Wales as its Patron.

The organisation keep an annual Watchlist, which categorises the animal breeds based on their species and the total number of registered breeding females in the UK. This helps to highlight changes in breed population trends.

Between 1900 and 1973 twenty-six native breeds of farm animal became extinct in Britain.

Fortunately in the 1960’s a small group of pioneers launched a crusade to prevent further loses. In 1973, their vision became the Rare Breeds Survival Trust (RBST) – an organisation dedicated to the conservation of Britain’s livestock heritage. Joe Henson was Founder Chairman of the RBST, which is now a thriving organisation with over 10,000 members and has his Royal Highness the Prince of Wales as its Patron.

The organisation keep an annual Watchlist, which categorises the animal breeds based on their species and the total number of registered breeding females in the UK. This helps to highlight changes in breed population trends.