Goats

During the late 19th and early 20th century many goats were imported and as a result our native goat was almost eliminated. The imported goats were mainly dairy breeds, but they cannot tolerate the British climate and need to be housed. In many parts of the world goats digest herbs and shrubs not palatable to other farm animals and are a vital source of meat, milk, fibre and natural fertiliser.

Bagot

Legend says that the ancestors of these goats were brought back from the crusades by Richard the Lion Heart in the 12th century.

What we do know for definite is that they were given to Lord Bagot by Richard II in the 1390’s and remained in Bagot Park, near Blithfield in Staffordshire for over 500 years. During the 1960’s, Bagot Park was flooded to create a reservoir to provide water for Birmingham and the goats had to be removed. A trio were given to the Cotswold Farm Park to found our herd.

RBST Watchlist StatusEndangered (100 to 200)

Bagot (1 of 1)-2
Boer kids (1 of 1)-8

Boer

The Boer goat is a native South African breed, first introduced into Britain in 1987. Whilst it was originally bred in the warm South African climate, the breed has now adapted well to the colder northern climate.

Where field shelters are provided, they can be kept in the fields throughout winter in lowland areas of the British Isles. They are quite stocky, with short legs and coupled with their docile nature, this makes it much easier to keep them in fenced paddocks than the longer legged breeds.

Golden Guernsey

The Golden Guernsey Goats are a very rare breed, native of Guernsey. They came close to extinction during the Second World War when Guernsey was occupied by German Forces and many of the goats were slaughtered for food. A small group was rescued by the late Miss Miriam Milburn. Thankfully, numbers are now gradually increasing both on the islands, and here on the mainland.

RBST Watchlist StatusMinority (500 to 1000)

Golden Guernsey-1-3
IMG-20200604-WA0017

Pygmy

Developed from the West African Dwarf goat, a good Pygmy goat is sturdy, compact and ‘cobby’. The head, neck and legs are short in relation to the length of the body. They enjoy having objects to climb on and explore. Their fun and confident personalities have made them very popular as pets. Their ability to adapt to a varied range of climates means they can be found all over the world.

Goats

During the late 19th and early 20th century many goats were imported and as a result our native goat was almost eliminated. The imported goats were mainly dairy breeds, but they cannot tolerate the British climate and need to be housed. In many parts of the world goats digest herbs and shrubs not palatable to other farm animals and are a vital source of meat, milk, fibre and natural fertiliser.

Bagot (1 of 1)-2

Bagot

Legend says that the ancestors of these goats were brought back from the crusades by Richard the Lion Heart in the 12th century.

What we do know for definite is that they were given to Lord Bagot by Richard II in the 1390’s and remained in Bagot Park, near Blithfield in Staffordshire for over 500 years. During the 1960’s, Bagot Park was flooded to create a reservoir to provide water for Birmingham and the goats had to be removed. A trio were given to the Cotswold Farm Park to found our herd.

RBST Watchlist StatusEndangered (100 to 200)

Boer kids (1 of 1)-8

Boer

The Boer goat is a native South African breed, first introduced into Britain in 1987. Whilst it was originally bred in the warm South African climate, the breed has now adapted well to the colder northern climate.

Where field shelters are provided, they can be kept in the fields throughout winter in lowland areas of the British Isles. They are quite stocky, with short legs and coupled with their docile nature, this makes it much easier to keep them in fenced paddocks than the longer legged breeds.

Golden Guernsey-1-3

Golden Guernsey

The Golden Guernsey Goats are a very rare breed, native of Guernsey. They came close to extinction during the Second World War when Guernsey was occupied by German Forces and many of the goats were slaughtered for food. A small group was rescued by the late Miss Miriam Milburn. Thankfully, numbers are now gradually increasing both on the islands, and here on the mainland.

RBST Watchlist StatusMinority (500 to 1000)

IMG-20200604-WA0017

Pygmy

Developed from the West African Dwarf goat, a good Pygmy goat is sturdy, compact and ‘cobby’. The head, neck and legs are short in relation to the length of the body. They enjoy having objects to climb on and explore. Their fun and confident personalities have made them very popular as pets. Their ability to adapt to a varied range of climates means they can be found all over the world.