Pigs

Our native stock was gradually improved by importing more prolific and productive strains from the Far East. Over the years local breeds became fixed, each with their own particular merits, but since the Second World War demand for a standard bacon carcase has produced long, lean hybrid breeds from a limited number of specialist strains. The large breeds, which tended to lay on surplus fat were no longer wanted.

CFP Lambing February 2018-271

Berkshire

The Berkshire is the oldest recorded pedigree pig breed in Britain. The Berkshire is a compact, short legged breed with a dished face, medium length snout and prick ears. They are black with white “socks”, white tail and a white mark on the face. Cromwell’s troops when stationed in Reading made reference to a local breed of pig renowned for its size and the quality of its bacon. This is one of the earliest records of the Berkshire and the breed of the 17th century was very different to the modern breed, being large and coming in a variety of colours.

The modern Berkshire was improved in the late 18th and 19th centuries by the introduction of Asian breeding. The breed became popular during the 19th and first half of the 20th century but declined in numbers when the emphasis in pig farming turned to bacon production and “white” pigs.

Gloucestershire Old Spot

In the Severn Valley, where it originated, the Gloucestershire Old Spot pig was traditionally raised on windfall apples and whey, products of the local agricultural enterprises. It was known at the time as the Orchard Pig.

A dual purpose breed, it is hardy and thrives out of doors. They get too fat in intensive indoor pig farms and like most non-commercial breeds, they are now extremely rare.

We often use the Old Spot for our meat products, which you can buy from the Farm Park shop.

RBST Watchlist StatusMinority (500 to 1000)

Glos Old Spot_F7W5247
facebook_1591197373963_6673965510405853379

Saddleback

The British Saddleback, a large, lop eared, deep bodied pig, is the amalgamation of two breeds: the Wessex Saddleback and the Essex. They’re easily identifiable; black bodied with white band around the saddle and the front legs and hind feet. Their nose and tail can also be white. There were black and white belted pigs in the west country as far back as the early 19th century and they were much renowned for their bacon.

Tamworth

The Tamworth is probably our oldest British breed of pig, with direct lineage from the European Wild Boar. They take their names from the Tamworth region of Staffordshire.

By 1975 the population of Tamworth pigs in this country had severely decreased. Fortunately settlers had taken the Tamworth to Australia, and while working with the BBC in Australia, Joe Henson was able to arrange for the RBST to re-import three unrelated boars. This has helped the breed to increase in numbers.

RBST Watchlist Status: Vulnerable (200 to 300)

Gingerpiglet

Pigs

Our native stock was gradually improved by importing more prolific and productive strains from the Far East. Over the years local breeds became fixed, each with their own particular merits, but since the Second World War demand for a standard bacon carcase has produced long, lean hybrid breeds from a limited number of specialist strains. The large breeds, which tended to lay on surplus fat were no longer wanted.

CFP Lambing February 2018-271

Berkshire

The Berkshire is the oldest recorded pedigree pig breed in Britain. The Berkshire is a compact, short legged breed with a dished face, medium length snout and prick ears. They are black with white “socks”, white tail and a white mark on the face. Cromwell’s troops when stationed in Reading made reference to a local breed of pig renowned for its size and the quality of its bacon. This is one of the earliest records of the Berkshire and the breed of the 17th century was very different to the modern breed, being large and coming in a variety of colours.

The modern Berkshire was improved in the late 18th and 19th centuries by the introduction of Asian breeding. The breed became popular during the 19th and first half of the 20th century but declined in numbers when the emphasis in pig farming turned to bacon production and “white” pigs.

Glos Old Spot_F7W5247

Gloucestershire

Old Spot

In the Severn Valley, where it originated, the Gloucestershire Old Spot pig was traditionally raised on windfall apples and whey, products of the local agricultural enterprises. It was known at the time as the Orchard Pig.

A dual purpose breed, it is hardy and thrives out of doors. They get too fat in intensive indoor pig farms and like most non-commercial breeds, they are now extremely rare.

We often use the Old Spot for our meat products, which you can buy from the Farm Park shop.

RBST Watchlist StatusMinority (500 to 1000)

facebook_1591197373963_6673965510405853379

Saddleback

The British Saddleback, a large, lop eared, deep bodied pig, is the amalgamation of two breeds: the Wessex Saddleback and the Essex. They’re easily identifiable; black bodied with white band around the saddle and the front legs and hind feet. Their nose and tail can also be white. There were black and white belted pigs in the west country as far back as the early 19th century and they were much renowned for their bacon.

Gingerpiglet

Tamworth

The Tamworth is probably our oldest British breed of pig, with direct lineage from the European Wild Boar. They take their names from the Tamworth region of Staffordshire.

By 1975 the population of Tamworth pigs in this country had severely decreased. Fortunately settlers had taken the Tamworth to Australia, and while working with the BBC in Australia, Joe Henson was able to arrange for the RBST to re-import three unrelated boars. This has helped the breed to increase in numbers.

RBST Watchlist Status: Vulnerable (200 to 300)